Private Practice Cardiology: Advice For Young Mothers

This article was authored by Riya Chacko, MD, a cardiologist at the Cardiovascular Group of Syracuse in Syracuse, NY, and a member of the ACC Women in Cardiology (WIC) Section.

In fellowship, no one prepares you for the decisions you will face in private practice and certainly not the issues you might face as a young mother.  As a result, many young mothers fall out of the workforce. I’ve decided to list a few issues below which I think other young moms and cardiologists should consider before starting private practice: Continue reading

Past ACC President Selected to Chair World Heart Federation Partners Council

This post was authored by John Gordon Harold, MD, MACC, past-president of the ACC.

I am honored to have been chosen as the chair of the World Heart Federation (WHF) Partners Council for 2016 on behalf of the ACC. In this new capacity representing the College, I led the first meeting of the WHF’s Partners Council in March 11 in London, England.

WHF President Salim Yusuf, MBBS, FACC, opened the meeting noting that the vision of the WHF is to work with members and the cardiovascular health community to hasten the day when cardiovascular health is no longer a privilege – but a right, and when cardiovascular disease is transformed from a life-threatening disease to one that can be prevented and managed in all populations. He added that the role of the WHF is to serve as the global facilitator, convener, trusted adviser and representative of cardiovascular disease stakeholders, driving the global cardiovascular health agenda by converting policy into action, through its members and a broader network of partners. Continue reading

Changing the Conversation: A Unique Approach to Legislative Practice Visits

This article was authored by Edward J. Toggart, MD, FACC, governor of the ACC Oregon Chapter.

Recently, I had the opportunity to meet with Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-OR), who is a veterinarian by trade and is in his 4th term in Congress. He currently serves on the House Health Subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce Committee. He also previously served as a member of the non-partisan Congressional Arts Caucus and was heavily involved in the repeal of the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR).

I was contacted by ACC’s Grassroots Advocacy manager about an opportunity for Rep. Schrader to make a practice visit. After accepting the offer, I immediately began thinking about how to best approach the visit, including how to communicate the critical issues facing the cardiology community. Continue reading

Making Progress in Social Media and Medicine: Engagement at ACC.16

Campbell headshotThis post was authored by Kevin R. Campbell, MD, FACC, assistant professor of medicine, University of North Carolina, division of cardiology, and a presenter at ACC.16.

I was amazed by the uptick in Social media engagement at ACC.16. While 75 percent of all fortune 500 companies are represented and active on twitter, doctors have been quite slow to enter into the social media space. Many of us have who have pioneered social media in medicine have often felt like Dr. Sisyphus as we push the “Social Boulder” up the hill in order to show our colleagues the value of digital engagement. However, it appears that finally the tide is turning.

From the very outset of the meeting the hashtag #ACC16 began trending. Just in time for the annual sessions, the ACC recently created and published a Cardiology Hashtag Ontology reference guide in order to bring together the broad topics within cardiovascular disease so that common subjects of discussion can be easily identified, searched and catalogued. Continue reading

ACC.16 Video Highlights – Day 3

See more insightful interviews on the hottest topics and Late-Breaking Clinical Trials from the last day of ACC.16 on the ACC’s ACC.16 YouTube Playlist. For comprehensive coverage of the meeting from the fellow perspective, see the full list of FITs on the GO videos on ACC’s FITs on the Go YouTube Playlist. The FITs on the GO video blog provides an FIT perspective of the meeting, featuring interviews with top experts and cardiovascular leaders on news and events taking place at ACC.16. Highlights from the third day include:

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Special Issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging Highlights Value of CV Imaging in Women

LESLEE_SHAW_HEADSHOTThis post was authored by Leslee J. Shaw, PhD, FACC, associate editor of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging and a member of ACC’s Cardiovascular Disease in Women Committee.

For decades, we have heard all of the statistics that more women are dying of coronary heart disease than men. This early finding from the mid-1980s has continued to unfurl with additional data on unique biologic differences coupled with quality of care differences between women and men. All of these factors disadvantage women and illustrate the sizeable gap in knowledge relating to heart disease for females.

If the goals of our health care system are to provide high-quality care for all, then for half the population, we have truly failed! Is this too much of a nihilist’s perspective? Maybe, as gains have been made. We have gained tremendous insight into sex-specific differences over the past decade based on evidence from research using cardiovascular imaging.

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Who Cares About Lifestyle … I Want Science!

FreemanThis post was authored by Andrew Freeman, MD, FACC (@heartcuredoc)

I have definitely heard people question the importance of lifestyle before. Exercise up until recently was considered “alternative” medicine, and diet was considered an adjunct to pills. However, very good data and research are now showing that once seemingly innocent things – diet, exercise, smoking cessation and now even mindfulness – are proving to be as potent or more potent for the vast majority of diseases that we treat.

The clincher here is this: How many of us actually “cure” disease? The answer: Mostly none of us. The pills and procedures we do usually palliate, remediate, or slow progression of disease, but almost none of what we do cures the underlying problem.

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2016 ACC/Merck Fellows Honored During 35th Anniversary Reception

The ACC/Merck Fellowship Program celebrated its 35th anniversary on April 2 during the ACC.16 Merck Awards Reception. This unique program has provided support to four fellows in training (FITs) seeking to launch careers in cardiovascular research. Over the past 35 years, Merck has generously offered almost 200 fellowships.

In selecting applications, proposals addressing cardiovascular disease and cardiometabolic disorders are encouraged, as well as proposals focusing on clinically relevant outcomes as a result of the metabolic syndrome, diabetes or obesity. Preference for one award is given to applicants focusing on disparities of care since despite increased attention to health disparities at the national, state and community levels, relatively little progress has been made in achieving the vision of eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities.

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ACC’s First Leadership Academy Cohort Presents Capstone Projects at ACC.16

This post was authored by Rosanne Nelson, an ACC staff member focused on member leadership development and the facilitator of ACC’s Leadership Academy.

Two years ago, a diverse group of 14 early career and Fellows-in-Training members of the ACC came together as strangers in a room. Each had been appointed to Cohort I of the College’s inaugural Leadership Academy program, the ACC program serves to meet our early career / FIT members where they need to be met, and supports leadership challenges in diverse practice areas. Few in the room during our initial meeting knew what to expect. As the leadership development program facilitator, I too was experiencing this program for the first time, and even upon our first meeting, I was amazed by their thirst for knowledge, and humbled by their admission of wanting to ‘lead better.’ As such, we set off to learn and lead together. Admittedly, the path was not as clear at the start. However, this group was eager, open, and honest about what they needed. Thus, a recipe for success was well underway. Continue reading